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Rape case lawyer says women are 'especially good' at lying

A lawyer for a wealthy Tennessee businessman who was later found not guilty in a Memphis rape trial made a comment during closing arguments Thursday that raised some eyebrows.

According to WHBQ, Steve Farese, attorney for Mark Giannini, said women are "especially good" at lying.

"People can be very good at lying," Farese said. "Women can be especially good at it because they're the weaker sex."

>> Watch the video here

Memphis Area Women's Council Executive Director Deborah Clubb told USA Today that she was "stunned" by the comments.

"It's despicable," she said. "It's absolutely despicable."

Farese told USA Today that his job "is not to care if anybody gets offended" and "smart people will see it for what it is."

According to WHBQ, the jury on Friday found Giannini not guilty on all charges in case. A woman had claimed that he raped her in 2014 when she visited his Eads mansion for what she thought was a job interview.

>> Read more trending news

As the verdict was read, the woman had an emotional breakdown in the courtroom. Giannini and Farese embraced one another.

The woman who accused him of rape has filed a $6 million lawsuit against Giannini.

If he had been found guilty, he would have faced up to 15 years in prison without the possibility of parole. 

Donald Trump reveals where he'll be instead of the White House Correspondents' Dinner

Every year, the White House Correspondents’ Dinner is one of the social events of the spring. For almost 100 years, journalists, government officials and celebrities have gotten together to crack jokes and eat expensive meals. The event has been attended by Frank Sinatra and Duke Ellington. In 2011, then-President Barack Obama roasted Donald Trump (who was in attendance), and some speculate that night was the moment when Trump decided he wanted Obama’s job.

>> Read more trending news

However, this year, now-President Trump won’t be in attendance. His decision came via a tweet in February. While it’s not traditional for a president to skip the event, Trump’s ongoing war with the media had many expecting that he wouldn’t be stopping by the Washington Hilton on the evening of the event.

The last president to skip the event was Ronald Reagan in 1981, though Reagan was recovering from a gunshot wound inflicted during an assassination attempt only days before, and he did call in to the event. Nixon also skipped the dinner twice.

Instead, Trump announced Saturday morning via Twitter that he will be holding a rally next weekend in Pennsylvania.

The White House has not said where the rally will be held, and Trump’s website does not have any rallies listed. His last event was in Nashville in March.

14-year-old recovers, smiles 2 months after being shot in head

A 14-year-old girl is going home following a long hospital stay. Police say two teenage boys shot her in the head and left her for dead in a canal near their school.

Deserae Turner of Smithfield, Utah, was found in extremely critical condition Feb. 17, KSL reports.

>> Watch the news report here

Two 16-year-old boys are accused of luring Deserae to join them after school, then shot her in the back of her head. Prosecutors say they stole her belongings and left her in a dry canal.

KSL reports that friends who were searching for her later found her unconscious in the canal.

>> Read more trending news

The teenage boys, who remain unnamed because they are minors, are charged with attempted aggravated murder, aggravated robbery and obstruction of justice.

Authorities testified during hearings that the teenage boys came up with the plan to “get rid” of Deserae while playing video games because one of the boys was tired of getting messages from Deserae on Snapchat.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

On Thursday, Deserae appeared at a press conference smiling and holding her mother’s hand. Pieces of the bullet still remain inside her head.

“I am so thankful to be here today, to be alive,” Deserae said. “I told by dad that I am tougher than a bullet. It is still with me today.”

At the press conference, Deserae wore a T-shirt that had the word “happy” written on it.

“It says happy on it, and I’m happy to go home,” Deserae said.

Rainy Sunday is finally here; the drought continues

Mostly cloudy skies and some scattered showers prevail this Sunday due to a mid-level disturbance traveling mainly over southern Florida from the Gulf of Mexico.

The main bulk of the precipitation will stay focused oN southern Florida, but a few beneficial downpours will make it to parts of Central Florida.

We are not expecting a washed out Sunday, but scattered rains will be welcomed as we continue to experience a severe drought in much of the region.

DOPPLER 9: TRACK THE SHOWERS

Rainfall amounts will stay below quarter of an inch, for the most part, but if slightly higher amounts are possible where showers and an isolated thunderstorm travels. Be mindful of lightning with those isolated storms.

GET LIGHTNING ALERTS WITHIN 6 MILES FROM YOUR LOCATION

Clouds will hold the high temperatures in the upper 80s inland and in the mid-80s along the coast. It’s going to feel muggy.

S

A weak cold front will be traveling through Central Florida, providing a relief from the heat we had since last week. A few very isolated showers associated with the front are possible during the early afternoon. Otherwise, mostly sunny with highs in the low-80s and low humidity as well. Winds will be strong on Monday and Tuesday; combined with the low humidity levels, expect a high fire threat across the area. Please follow the authorities instructions, burn bans are likely to continue in effect.

INTERACTIVE DROUGHT MONITOR: A MONTH'S CHANGE

EXTREME HEAT AND WILDFIRES

Another dry (and warming) spell is in the board for the rest of next week. Temperatures will be warming to the upper-80s to low-90s by Thursday and Friday with a westerly flow.

Humidity will also gradually start to increase by the end of the week.

Meteorologist Brian Shields will start to monitor the development of showers and update the forecast starting at 5 a.m. through Noon. Meteorologist George Waldenberger will be tracking the showers and any thunderstorms development through the afternoon and will be live on Eyewitness News at 6 p.m. Make sure to follow them on social media and get the prompt updates. 

 

Follow our Meteorologists Tom Terry Brian Shields George Waldenberger Eboni Deon Rusty McCraine Irene Sans

10-year-old boy with autism arrested at school

Luanne Haygood, the mother of a 10-year-old boy with autism, is angry that her son was arrested earlier this month at his Florida school for allegedly punching and kicking his teacher six months ago. Okeechobee County school resource officers put the child in handcuffs at Okeechobee Achievement Academy, but Haygood said the school district isn’t properly equipped to deal with autistic children.

“He has autism. He doesn’t know what’s going on,” she can be heard saying in the video that she recorded of her son’s arrest. “He’s scared to death. He’s 10 years old.”

>> Watch Haygood's video here (WARNING: Viewer discretion advised)

Haygood watched as her son was removed from his classroom for allegedly leaving a paraprofessional with scratches and other marks back in October. He was arrested on an outstanding warrant on allegations of felony battery on a school board authority.

“I was extremely angry. That I felt like this was a power play. I felt like this was a this is what you get. You can’t do anything about it. We’re going to arrest your son if he can’t abide by the rules,” Haygood told WFOR, adding that her son's disability is the reason behind his behavior. “To go and have him arrested on school grounds in front of other students, in front of personnel, during school hours – they could’ve come to my house at any time to tell me what was going on.”

>> Read more trending news

The boy reportedly spent one night in juvenile detention, according to the Washington Post. The child was then released on house arrest and is expected to appear in court next month.

Haygood said the incident would never have happened if the school had the proper services to address his disability.

“I want something done," she told WFOR. "I want other kids to not have to go through this.”

According to CNN, the school district released the following statement:

"It has been district procedure to invite students in to take the Florida Standards Assessment. The district would not invite someone to one of our campuses for the sole purpose to arrest.

"The district routinely assists students by providing services from our board certified behavioral analyst, licensed mental health counselors, school social workers, and psychologists. As a team, these individuals develop interventions, conduct assessments, and offer support both at school and in the home in order to assist students and families.

"The district is unable to provide specific information as to both current and past incidents regarding this or any other student due to educational laws and rules. It is our hope that we can continue to work with all families to help their students improve both behaviorally and academically."

– The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

Happy Days Actress Erin Moran Found Dead

Happy Days Actress Erin Moran Found Dead

How to Meet Your Protein Needs without Meat

Eating a vegetarian diet can be very healthful and rewarding. However, most vegetarians—including soon-to-be vegetarians and their meat-eating loved ones—are concerned about getting adequate protein. Most people are accustomed to getting protein from meat, but what else contains protein? Aren't plant-based proteins "incomplete" or lower quality? Fortunately, with a bit of extra attention, you won't have any trouble meeting your protein needs just because you give up meat. There are so many protein-packed vegetarian options! Did you know that most foods, including vegetables, have some of the essential muscle-building nutrient? Without looking closely, it is easy to miss some great sources. (Who knew a cup of broccoli had 3 grams!) Nuts, seeds, soy products, cereal, eggs and dairy are all good meatless protein choices. These groups of food each contain different amino acids (the building blocks of proteins) and different levels of protein quality. There is no need to consume certain foods in special combinations as nutritionists once thought! When your diet includes a variety of each of these types of foods, you can rest assured that you're consuming all the amino acids you need for muscle growth and cell repair.  Pin this graphic for easy reference and scroll down for more details. Nuts Nuts provide a good dose of protein along with some heart-healthy fatty acids and antioxidants (vitamins A and E). They are also packed full of fiber. Take your pick! Many nuts have a significant source of protein ready to work for your body. Peanuts, almonds, pistachios, cashews, and pine nuts are among the highest in protein, while chestnuts and hazelnuts, although they do still have some protein, are the lowest. Think out of the box when you’re adding nuts to your diet. They can be grated, toasted, ground or eaten raw and are great when combined with salads, wraps, soups and stews and baked goods. But pay special attention to portion size! Nuts are a great source of many nutrients, but do come with a hefty dose of calories, thanks to the healthy fats they contain. A single serving is just 1 oz! Many nuts are best when stored in a refrigerator, which helps keep their fats from going rancid (for up to 6 months).   Nuts, 1/4 cup Protein Calories Fat Peanuts, raw 9 g 207 18 g Almonds, dry roasted 8 g 206 18 g Pistachios 6 g 171 14 g Hazelnuts 5 g 212 21 g Pine nuts 5 g 229 23 g Cashews, raw 5 g 197 16 g Walnuts 4 g 164 16 g Seeds Seeds are another great way to grab a few grams of protein and many other nutrients. Healthful unsaturated fats, as well as phytochemicals, make seeds a powerhouse for heart disease and cancer prevention. Just a quarter cup of pumpkin seeds (also called pepitas) has 8.5 grams of protein. Add this amount to a salad or eat them plain for a quick snack. Sunflower seeds are easy to add to pasta or salads, or sandwich wraps, while sesame seeds are easily ground and sprinkled onto steamed veggies for a protein dusting.   Seeds (1/4 cup) Protein Calories Fat Hemp seeds 15 g 232 18 g Pumpkin seeds, roasted 9 g 187 16 g Flaxseed 8 g 191 13 g Sunflower seeds, roasted 8 g 205 18 g Sesame seeds, roasted 6 g 206 18 g Legumes Dried peas, beans and lentils belong to a group of food known as "pulses" or "legumes." Aside from soybeans, these plants have a very similar nutrient content, which includes a good dose of protein. On average, they have about 15 grams of protein per cup, and tagging along with the essentials protein are fiber and iron. Adding beans, lentils and dried peas to your meals is a great way to replace meat (a beef burrito can easily become a black bean burrito, for example) while still getting your much needed protein. Add pulses to soups, salads, omelets, burritos, casseroles, pasta dishes, and more! Make bean dips (such as hummus, which is made from garbanzo beans, or black bean dip) to spread on sandwiches and use as protein-packed dips for veggies or snack foods.   Legumes, 1 cup cooked Protein Calories Fiber Soybeans 29 g 298 10 g Lentils 18 g 230 16 g Split peas 16 g 231 16 g Navy beans 16 g 258 12 g Garbanzo beans (chickpeas) 15 g 269 12 g Black beans 15 g 227 15 g Kidney beans 15 g 225 11 g Lima beans 15 g 216 13 g Pinto beans 14 g 234 15 g Soy Soybeans are a complete protein that is comparable in quality with animal proteins. Eating soybeans (and foods made from soybeans) has been growing trend in America for only five decades, but this protein-rich bean has been a staple in Asia for nearly 4,000 years! This plant powerhouse is used to create a variety of soy-based foods that are rich in protein: tofu, tempeh, textured vegetable protein (TVP, a convincing replacement for ground meat in recipes), soymilk and "meat analogs," such as vegetarian "chicken" or faux "ribs" are all becoming more popular as more Americans practice vegetarianism. To learn more about using tofu, read Tofu 101. To learn how soy may impact your health, click here.   Soy Foods Protein Calories Fat Soybeans, 1 cup cooked 29 g 298 10 g Tempeh, 4 oz cooked 21 g 223 13 g Edamame, 1 cup shelled 20 g 240 10 g TVP, 1/4 cup dry 12 g 80 0 g Soy nuts, 1/4 cup roasted 11 g 200 1 g Tofu, 4 oz raw 9 g 86 5 g Soy nut butter, 2 tablespoons 7 g 170 11 g Soymilk, 1 cup sweetened 7 g 100 0.5 g Soymilk, 1 cup unsweetened 7 g 80 0.5 g Grains In a culture that focuses largely on wheat, it's easy to overlook the many types of other grains available to us. Some of these grains are very high in protein and can be included in your diet for both whole-grain carbohydrates and muscle-building protein. Quinoa is unusually close to animal products in protein quality, making it an excellent grain to replace white rice or couscous. It can also be cooked and mixed with honey, berries and almonds in the morning for a protein-packed breakfast. Other grains high in protein include spelt, amaranth, oats and buckwheat. Choose whole-grain varieties of cereals, pastas, breads and rice for a more nutritious meal.   Grains Protein Calories Fiber Amaranth, 1 cup cooked 9 g 238 9 g Quinoa, 1 cup cooked 9 g 254 4 g Whole wheat pasta, 1 cup cooked 8 g 174 6 g Barley, 1 cup cooked 7 g 270 14 g Spelt, 4 oz cooked 6 g 144 4 g Oats, 1 cup cooked 6 g 147 4 g Bulgur, 1 cup cooked 6 g 151 8 g Buckwheat, 1 cup cooked 6 g 155 5 g Brown rice, 1 cup cooked 5 g 216 4 g Whole wheat bread, 1 slice 4 g 128 3 g Sprouted grain bread, 1 slice 4 g 80 3 g Dairy If you consume milk products, dairy is a great way to add some extra grams of protein to your day. Low-fat milk, cheese and yogurt are easily accessible, quick to pack and fun to incorporate into many meals and snacks. Whether you’re drinking a cup of skim milk with your dinner or grabbing some string cheese before you run errands, you can pack about 8 grams of protein into most servings of dairy. You’re also getting some bone-building calcium while you’re at it! Keep in mind that low-fat varieties of milk products are lower in calories and fat, but equal in calcium to the full-fat versions; low-fat varieties may also be higher in protein.   Dairy Protein Calories Fat Fat-free cottage cheese, 1 cup 31 g 160 1 g 2% cottage cheese, 1 cup 30 g 203 4 g 1% cottage cheese, 1 cup 28 g 163 2 g Fat-free plain yogurt, 1 cup 14 g 137 0 g Low-fat plain yogurt, 1 cup 13 g 155 4 g Parmesan cheese, 1 oz grated 12 g 129 9 g Whole milk yogurt, 1 cup 9 g 150 8 g Goat's milk, 1 cup 9 g 168 10 g 1% milk, 1 cup 8 g 102 2 g Swiss cheese, 1 oz 8 g 106 8 g 2% milk, 1 cup 8 g 121 7 g 3.25% (whole) milk, 1 cup 8 g 146 8 g Low-fat cheddar/Colby cheese, 1 oz 7 g 49 2 g Part-skim mozzarella cheese, 1 oz 7 g 72 5 g Provolone cheese, 1 oz 7 g 100 8 g Cheddar cheese, 1 oz 7 g 114 9 g Blue cheese, 1 oz 6 g 100 8 g American cheese, 1 oz 6 g 106 9 g Goat cheese, 1 oz 5 g 76 6 g Feta cheese, 1 oz 4 g 75 6 g Part-skim ricotta cheese, 1 oz 3 g 39 2 g Eggs Eggs contain the highest biologic value protein available. What this means is that an egg has a near perfect combination of amino acids within its shell; when assessing protein quality of all other foods (including meat), nutrition experts compare them to the egg. This doesn’t mean that all other sources of protein are less healthful or less important but does mean that an egg is an awesome way to get a few grams of protein. At 6 grams for one large egg, there are endless ways to add it to your diet. Salads, sandwiches, breakfasts or snack—an egg can fit in anytime!   Eggs Protein Calories Fat Egg, 1 boiled 6 g 68 5 g Egg white, 1 cooked 5 g 17 0 g Liquid egg substitute, 1.5 fl oz 5 g 23 0 g As you can see, protein is EVERYWHERE in our diet, and even without meat you can get enough every day; you just have to look in the right places! For more ideas for using these various plant-based proteins, check out our dailySpark series, Meat-Free Fridays for recipe and cooking ideas! Selected Sources Information Sheet: Protein from The Vegetarian Society (VegSoc.org) Various nutrient profiles from The World's Healthiest Foods (WHFoods.com) Want to learn more about going meatless? Check out SparkPeople's first e-book! It's packed with over 120 delicious meat-free recipes, plus tips and tricks for going meatless. Get it on Amazon for $2.99 and start cooking easy, wholesome veg-centric meals the whole family will love!Article Source: http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/nutrition_articles.asp?id=158

Best and Worst Salad Toppings

A few years back I typed up a list of New Year’s resolutions on a small piece of cardstock, laminated it, and put it in my wallet. On that list was the resolution to eat a salad every day, simply because eating salad always made me feel like I was doing something good for myself. After all, salad provides several vitamins and can fill you up while reducing your caloric intake. What could be healthier than a big, fresh salad? Unfortunately, many things, as I later found out. Salads can run the gamut of healthiness, depending on what is in them. Although that big bowl of greens may be packed full of antioxidants and fiber, it can also be laden with fat, cholesterol, and sodium—not to mention an overabundance of calories. Some restaurant salads can even contain more calories than a cheeseburger! Luckily, like most things in life, a salad is the outcome of several small decisions. To make sure you don't sabotage your healthy diet unintentionally, choose wisely the next time you order a salad from a restaurant or visit the salad bar. When dining out, don't be afraid to ask questions, make special requests (extra veggies, dressing on the side, light cheese) and ask about substitutions (like grilled chicken for breaded). Most restaurants will be happy to accommodate you as long as their kitchen is stocked with the ingredients you want. Here’s how to choose wisely next time you're making a salad at home or choosing one from a menu. Lettuce The foundation of most salads, lettuce adds substance, crunch, water, and fiber for very few calories—only about 10 per cup. But if you want all that and vitamins, too, toss out the iceberg and toss in the romaine, mixed baby greens and spinach. While iceberg lettuce is lower in nutrients (and still makes a decent choice if it's the only thing available), these other greens are rich in vitamins A, C and K, manganese, and folate. Protein Adding protein, such as lean meat, tofu, eggs or beans, will help bulk up your salad and keep you full longer. Unfortunately, many protein toppings are deep-fried, breaded and greasy, which adds unnecessary calories plus cholesterol, sodium and fat to your salad. Skimp on fattier toppings such as bacon and fried (breaded) chicken strips, and go for lean proteins instead. Grilled chicken, canned beans of all kinds, chickpeas, tofu, hardboiled eggs (especially whites), or water-packed tuna are leaner choices. Nuts and seeds are popular in salads, too, and while they’re a healthy source of good fats and some protein, they’re not exactly low-cal. If you choose to add them, watch your portions (1/2 ounce contains more than 80 calories). Cheese Restaurants know that people love cheese, so they tend to pile on multiple servings of it on their salads. It might be tasty, but it sends the calorie counts sky high! While cheese is a nutritious food that adds flavor, calcium, and protein to a salad, enjoy it in moderation due to its high fat content. Just a half-cup of cheddar cheese (the amount on many large restaurant salads) contains 18 grams of fat and 225 calories. To keep calories in check, use a single serving of cheese (approximately 2 tablespoons). Choose low-fat varieties as much as possible to save on saturated fat and calories. A smaller amount of a stronger-flavored cheese, such as Brie, feta, chevre, gorgonzola, sharp cheddar or bleu cheese will go a long way in helping you cut down on your portions. Pile on the Veggies Vegetables like bell peppers, grated carrots, sugar snap peas, and tomatoes provide flavor, fiber, and vitamins for few calories. Grated carrots, for example, have only 45 calories in a whole cup, and there are only about 20 calories in an entire red bell pepper. When building your best salad, use as many veggies as possible for extra filling power—and a nice crunch! Practice moderation when it comes to starchy vegetable toppings like corn and potatoes, which are higher in calories. And remember to go for a variety of colors to ensure you're getting several different nutrients and antioxidants in your salad bowl. Don't Forget the Fruit Don't leave fruit on the sidelines! Fresh, canned and dried fruits add a sweetness that can help temper the slightly bitter taste of greens and veggies. They also provide color and texture (not to mention nutrition) to your salad bowl. Chopped apples, pears, grapes, or mandarin oranges (canned in juice—not syrup—and drained) are excellent salad toppers. Chewy dried fruits (cranberries, raisins) work well, too, but they are also high in calories (so only use a sprinkle!). Avocados (and the guacamole made from them) are creamy and nutritious thanks to their heart-healthy fats, but they're also a concentrated sources of calories. Keep your use of avocado to a minimum if you're watching your weight. Crunchy Toppings Sesame sticks, crispy noodles and croutons are salty and crunchy but conceal lot of hidden fat. Better options include water chestnuts, apple slivers, a small serving of nuts, crumbled whole-grain crackers, and homemade croutons. To make your own low-fat croutons, just slice a large clove of garlic and rub it over both sides of a piece of whole-grain bread. Cut the bread into cubes and then brown it in the toaster or conventional oven. Dressing A very healthy salad could go very wrong with one too many shakes of oil or dressing. The main issue with dressing is its fat and sodium content—and the fact that people have trouble controlling their portions. Two tablespoons is an appropriate serving of dressing, but most restaurants serve much more than that, whether mixed in to your salad or served on the side. Those calories add up fast. When dining out, always ask for dressing on the side and dip your fork into the dressing before picking up your bite of salad. Caesar, ranch and other cream-based dressings (when not specified as low-fat) are calorie bombs worth avoiding. Look for dressings specified as "low-fat" that contain no more than 60 calories per serving. You can also add flavor for minimal calories by using salsa, vinegar or lemon juice. Salad may be the symbol of healthy eating, but not every salad is healthful—or diet-friendly. The healthfulness of your next salad depends on the simple choices you make when topping or dressing it. Perhaps my greatest discovery about salads was that because you can customize them so easily, you could make a huge main-course salad for a very small amount of calories. Pile in the lettuce and veggies, add a moderate amount of lean protein, sprinkling some cheese and a little something crunchy and measure a portion-controlled side of dressing, and you’ve got a dinner that won’t leave you feeling hungry.Article Source: http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/nutrition_articles.asp?id=1388

Umami: What You've Been Missing!

You've slimmed down your recipes, made healthy food swaps, and integrated vegetables into your meals. But do you ever feel like your food is missing something? When you finish eating, do you ever wonder why a meal just didn't hit the spot? You're probably missing umami. You've probably heard of the four basic tastes: bitter, sour, sweet and salty. Well, "umami," which means "yummy" in Japanese, is another distinct taste. Commonly found in fermented or aged foods, umami (pronounced ooh-mah-mee) adds that "mouth feel" to food. It makes your food feel richer, more delicious and more decadent. A key component in Chinese and Japanese cuisine, umami is starting to gain importance in Western cooking. American cooking tends to rely on fat or salt to get that feeling, but there are other, healthier ways to give your food and meals a little more oomph. Ever notice how parmesan makes pasta taste so much better? Or how much tastier ketchup makes your burgers? The parmesan, the tomatoes, and the beef all contain umami. Think about Japanese miso soup or almost any Chinese food. They're delicious and satisfying, thanks to umami-rich seaweed, fish, and soy sauce. Many foods are considered to have umami, including familiar foods like pepperoni pizza and hamburgers! And many condiments that seem to add "empty" calories (ketchup, steak sauce and Worcestershire sauce) actually help food feel more satisfying when you eat it. Here's a list of some umami rich foods:

By adding more of these foods to your meals, you can boost your satisfaction and potentially eat fewer calories overall and avoid overeating. A little goes a long way, and many foods rich in umami should be used as seasonings rather than main ingredients because they can be high in sodium and fat. Try adding a pinch of Romano cheese to steamed veggies or adding asparagus or mushrooms to your salad. If you're feeling decadent, put a pinch of crumbled bacon or a couple of sun-dried tomatoes in an egg white omelet. That could be just what hits the spot! Article Source: http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/nutrition_articles.asp?id=1348

30 Ways to Revitalize Your Lunch Break

Lunchtime doesn't have to be bland or boring, just as it doesn't have to be a frenzied time to run errands or multitask. Our printable calendar provides 30 ideas to add a little adventure to your midday break. Click here to download and print your Adventurous Lunch Break Calendar. (You need Adobe Acrobat Reader to download this PDF.) If you think your friends or family members might benefit from these heart-healthy tips, share this calendar with them by clicking the "Share" button below.Article Source: http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/nutrition_articles.asp?id=1336

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